claire Dec 2018
around the edges, she crumbles to the touch

burnt & scarred,

she is broken.


If she dares move, she risks becoming nothing more

than a single, burning ember

already, the two are similar

fighting to stay alive, she is burning out
Why are we in a hurry?
and there is so much to worry...
When everything has already been there
And we just live it through
About the choices we care
About the moments of me and you

Why are we in a hurry?
And there is so much to bother
When the book was published long ago
And we just read it through
About the different chapters
About the ends and beginnings like the pages are new

Why are we in a hurry?
And there is so much to achieve
When the doubt is you believe
And we just cry it through
About the facts and decisions
About the lies and what is true

Why are we in a hurry?
And there is so much at stake
When the dark nights are awake
And we just count it through
About the minutes and seconds
Hack the system of life just to pretend
Running out of time?
Toxic yeti Nov 2018
One winter night
A beautiful tibetan woman
When for a walk
In the moonlight
It seemed meditative
She done it before.  
But this night was goning to be different.  
A mysterious
Creature
Attacks and threatenes her
So shook up
A fear the man
And his lies
She ran.  
Ran until she was either safe or passed out.  
Either way she had to get away.
Statistics on **** and other ****** assaults are commonly available in industrialized countries, and are becoming more common throughout the world. Inconsistent definitions of ****, different rates of reporting, recording, prosecution and conviction for **** create controversial statistical disparities, and lead to accusations that many **** statistics are unreliable or misleading.[1][2] In some jurisdictions, male-female **** is the only form of **** counted in the statistics.[2] Countries may not define forced *** on a spouse as "****".[3] **** is a severely under-reported crime with surveys showing dark figures of up to 91.6% of rapes going unreported.[4][5] Prevalence of reasons for not reporting **** differ across countries. They may include fear of retaliation, uncertainty about whether a crime was committed or if the offender intended harm, not wanting others to know about the ****, not wanting the offender to get in trouble, fear of prosecution (e.g. due to laws against premarital ***), and doubt in local law enforcement.[6][7]
A United Nations statistical report compiled from government sources showed that more than 250,000 cases of **** or attempted **** were recorded by police annually. The reported data covered 65 countries.[8]



Canada.  
one out of every 17 women is *****, 62% of **** victims were physically injured, 9% were beaten or disfigured.[73]


United States
Edit
Main article: **** in the United States

**** rates in the U.S. per 1,000 people, 1973–2003.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention maintains recent statistics and standardized definitions upon which their statistics are based.[275] A 2011 report on prison **** stated that "in 2008 there were at least 69,800 inmates who were ***** under conditions involving force or threat of force, and more than 216,600 total victims of ****** abuse, in America’s prisons, jails, and juvenile detention centers."[276]
Data on the prevalence of **** vary greatly depending on what definition of **** is used. The FBI recorded 85,593 rapes in 2010. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported nearly 1.3 million incidents that year. It should however be noted that the CDC's definition of **** "represents the public health perspective" and takes into account the ability of the victim to consent to *** because he or she had been drinking or taking drugs while the FBI defines **** as "*******, no matter how slight, of the ****** or **** with any body part or object, or oral ******* by a *** ***** of another person, without the consent of the victim."[277]
A 2007 survey by the National Institute of Justice found that 19.0% of college women and 6.1% of college men experienced either ****** assault or attempted ****** assault since entering college.[278] In the University of Pennsylvania Law Review in 2017, D. Tuerkheimer reviewed the literature on **** allegations, and reported on the problems surrounding credibility of **** victims, and how that relates to false **** accusations. She pointed to national survey data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that indicates 1 in every 5 women (and 1 in 71 men) will be ***** during their lifetime at some point. Despite the prevalence of **** and the fact that false **** allegations are rare, Tuerkheimer reported that law enforcement officers often default to disbelief about an alleged ****. This documented prejudice leads to reduced investigation and criminal justice outcomes that are faulty compared to other crimes. Tuerkheimer says that women face "credibility discounts" at all stages of the justice system, including from police, jurors, judges and prosecutors. These credibility discounts are especially pronounced when the victim is acquainted with the accuser, and the vast majority of rapes fall into this category.[279] The U.S. Department of Justice estimated from 2005-2007 that about 2% of victims who were ***** while incapacitated (from drugs, alcohol or other reason) reported the **** to the police, compared to 13% of victims who experienced physically forced ****** assault.[280]
The 1998 the National Violence Against Women Survey, based on a sample size of 8000, described the incidence of **** as 1 in 6 women and 1 in 33 men based upon the report of experiencing an attempted or completed **** in her or his lifetime.[281]
A 1997 study on the non-institutionalized, non-military population by the U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics, which defines **** as forced ******* by the offender,[282] found that 91% of reported **** victims are female and 9% are male.[283]
The majority of rapes in the United States go unreported.[284][277] According to the American Medical Association (1995), ****** violence, and **** in particular, is considered the most under-reported violent crime.[285] Some of the most common reasons given by victims for not reporting rapes are when the victim considers it a personal or private matter, and the fear of reprisal from the assailant.[286] Under-reporting affects the accuracy of this data.
A significant number of rapes reported to the police do not advance to prosecution.[287] Twenty-five percent of reported rapes result in arrest.[288] Only 16% of rapes and ****** assaults are reported to the police (**** in America: A Report to the Nation. 1992 and United Nations Populations Fund, 2000a).[289][290] Factoring in unreported rapes, about 5% of rapists will ever spend a day in jail.[291]
Contrary to widespread belief, **** outdoors is rare. Over two thirds of all rapes occur in someone's home. 31% occur in the perpetrators' homes, 27% in the victims' homes and 10% in homes shared by the victim and perpetrator. 7% occur at parties, 7% in vehicles, 4% outdoors and 2% in bars.[292] From 2000 to 2005, 59% of rapes were not reported to law enforcement.[293][294] One factor relating to this is the misconception that most rapes are committed by strangers.[293][295] In reality, studies indicate the following varying numbers:
Source:
Current or former intimate partner
Another relative
Friend or acquaintance
Stranger
US Bureau of Justice statistics
26%
7%
38%
26%
Australian government statistics[296]
56%
10%
27%
8%
UK Home Office (for comparison)[297]
45.4%
13.9%
29.6%
11%
In a 2012 news story, The New York Times reported, " ... according to a survey by the Alaska Federation of Natives, the rate of ****** violence in rural villages like Emmonak is as much as 12 times the national rate. And interviews with Native American women here and across the nation’s tribal reservations suggest an even grimmer reality: They say few, if any, female relatives or close friends have escaped ****** violence."[298]
Drug use, especially alcohol, is frequently involved in ****. A study (only of **** victims that were female and reachable by phone) reported detailed findings related to tactics. In 47% of such rapes, both the victim and the perpetrator had been drinking. In 17%, only the perpetrator had been. 7% of the time, only the victim had been drinking. Rapes where neither the victim nor the perpetrator had been drinking were 29% of all rapes.[292]
Koss, Gidycz and Wi published a study in 1987 where they interviewed approximately 6,000 college students on 32 college campuses nationwide. They asked several questions covering a wide range of behaviors. From this study, 15% of college women answered "yes" to questions about whether they experienced something that met the definition of ****. 12% of women answered "yes" to questions about whether they experienced something that met the definition of attempted ****. Moreover, depending on the region, 2-6% of the men interviewed admitted to ****. While the study focused on female victims and male perpetrators; it did not consider **** of men or **** in LGBT relationships.[299]
In 1995, the CDC replicated part of this study with 8,810 students on 138 college campuses. They examined **** only, and did not look at attempted ****. They found that 20% of women and 4% of men experienced **** during the course of her or his lifetime.[300][301][clarification needed lifetime or college time?]
In 2000, the National Institute of Justice and the Bureau of Justice Statistics published a study called "The ****** Victimization of College Women" based on a 1996–1997 survey. The study found that 3.1% of undergraduate women reported experiencing an act that met the researchers' definition of **** or attempted **** during a 6–7-month academic year. However, of those found to have experienced completed ****, only 46.5% of the victims answered that they considered the incident to be a ****, while 48.8% did not and 4.7% were unsure. The study also found that 10.1% of college women experienced **** and 10.9% experienced attempted **** prior to entering college. Victimization of men was not considered as part of this study.[302]
In a different section of the report, the authors speculate about whether statistics during an academic year generalize to an entire college experience. For a full discussion, read more on page 10 of the report, stating that "... the percentage of completed or attempted **** victimization among women in higher educational institutions might climb to between one-fifth and one-quarter" and further acknowledging in the corresponding footnote, #18, that "These projections are suggestive. To assess accurately the victimization risk for women throughout a college career, longitudinal research following a cohort of female students across time is needed."
80,000 American children are sexually abused each year. But unreported cases are higher, due to the fear among children.[303] Over ninety percent of the time, the perpetrator is someone familiar or close with the child. Sexually violent crimes targeting children involve forced ****** activities such as *******, *******, and/or other explicit contact with a minor. According to Child Protective Services, eighty percent of the time, a parent ends up being the perpetrator. Children who become victims of this crime often end up developing phobias, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder, as well as performing poorly in school. Sexually violent crimes of all ages occur often.[304]
According to United States Department of Justice document Criminal Victimization in the United States, there were overall 191,670 victims of **** or ****** assault reported in 2005.[305]
Denov (2004) states that societal responses to the issue of female perpetrators of ****** assault "point to a widespread denial of women as potential ****** aggressors that could work to obscure the true dimensions of the problem."[306] Particularly as an increasing population of un-convicted felons and rapists who continue to insist that accusation of ****** assault is a punishment in lieu of justice through law enforcement agencies. It is thought that to be accused of **** brings shame to their families and social communities.
According to the National Crime Victimization Survey, the adjusted per-capita victimization rate of **** has declined from about 2.4 per 1000 people (age 12 and above) in 1980 to about 0.4 per 1000 people in 2006, a decline of about 85%.[307] But other government surveys, such as the ****** Victimization of College Women study, critique the NCVS on the basis it includes only those acts perceived as crimes by the victim, and report a higher victimization rate.[308] Despite a decline of 60% since 1993, the US still has a relatively high rate of **** when compared to other developed countries.[309]
RAINN asserts that from 2000 to 2005, 59% of rapes were not reported to law enforcement.[293][294] For college students, the figure was 95% in 2000.[308] One factor relating to this is the misconception that most rapes are committed by strangers.[310] According to the Bureau of Justice Statistics, 38% of victims were ***** by a friend or acquaintance, 28% by "an intimate" and 7% by another relative, and 26% were committed by a stranger to the victim. About four out of ten ****** assaults take place at the victim's own home.  




*did you know that every 98 seconds some gets or threatened with **** in North America.
Sarah Michelle Oct 2018
I will do the things
I'm afraid to do

I will drive a car without thinking of
Hydroplaning and rear-endings
I will carve my name into walls
Without thinking about vandalism
I will write this poem on my phone in the bath
Without thinking about electrocution
I will talk to the tall looming figure,
Whoever they may be,
Without looking down on myself
I will read you this poem
Without thinking its even true
I will tell my friends I love them
Without needing them to need me
To love them
 I will tell everyone I'm scared
Without thinking about it being true
I will leave home
Without thinking about comfort
I will get a job
That isn't always comfortable
I will make things that don't have power
Without thinking they need to have power
I will flirt and fall into some arms
Without thinking about the falling part
Or whose arms they are
And I will make love
And I will push away my love
And I will make love with someone else
Without making myself think about
The others I've made love to

But I will think about the others
I've made love to
Because they may not always seem worth
The fear I had to drown in
In order to gasp for air
And I will quit my uncomfortable job
Because I will think I have the right
To never be sweaty under the eyes and arms
And I will delete my friends
Because I stopped talking to them
A year ago when I made love the last time
and quit my job
And I will move back home
And I will stop driving myself elsewhere
And I will stop letting the world know
I have a name
And I will stop writing poems in the bath
And I will stop taking baths,
And I will stop writing poems

And I will try to do these things
I'm afraid to do.
Aaron LaLux Sep 2018
Games on,
and a lot of players are playing games,
but the jokes on you if your card’s the Fool,
don’t be read can’t blame the player blame the game,

so spin the wheel pick a number,
act it out name that tune,
but don’t debate what the haters say,
because love will conquer all,

because at the end of the day,
that’s all that really matters,
so show me what’s real now,
or see you later…

∆ LaLux ∆
Ash Aug 2018
Am at this edge
Looking down at beautiful  clouds,
Tired of wondering,
How it feels to  ,fly with my generations eagles,
How it feels to ,breath the top air,
How it feels to,stay full because am always hungry,
How it feels to ,have my hands for wings,
How it feels to ,use my dear friend fear to get me there,
Because fear is,my dear friend who drove me here.

I see this beautiful people, flying above me,
So beautiful,so bold,larger than life as they eminate love,
I hear voices, saying just jump,
Take this risk,Fly with us we will teach you,
For there are many who you will help, just jump,
Fear my driver,my friend,
Took a plunge I heard him squeal,
I don't see him flying though,
Neither did I hear him fall,
But I can feel him take control now,
Giving me excuses not to jump,
Offering a ride back,
To my comfort zone home

Thank you fear,
For driving me here,
I don't want a ride ,
I'll take the plunge,
I won't close my eyes,I'll keep them wide,
Stalling,like a bullet will rob my time,
I'm burning the brigdes by this, I don't care,
I'll hit the ground running,
Or spread this hands, coaxing the birds,
Fear my friend,some times my coward friend,
Hop on my back seat,
You've drove me forso long,It's my turn now,
Your my friend,I won't cast you aside,
So buckle up, collect  the memories as I drive.
Sometimes we get stuck in wrong situations,at that point time due to our animal instincts our emotions and brains combine creating this illusion called fear,Fear in turn triggers the fight or flight and now it's up to your brains conditioning to pick one fear will give you a ride to whichever you choose,This are not the only options though because if you have ever run from what every problem it is  you wear running from,It might be addiction, a bad marriage,failure in any dimension of your life you name it,if you get to a state of fear your mind will give you solutions what you should have done,what you can still do,how you can fix it,how you can learn from it and again Solutions but most often this same fear can hold you back,it's ironic like that it gives you a solution then holds you back showing you everything that could go wrong so your brain and your soul are in a battle one wants to go ahead use this solutions when the other is visualizing all the ways everything could go wrong .I've found myself in this kind of situations a lot.So I wrote this to just when I was about to make a life changing decision yes it was out of fear but it is the best choice I have no regrets.Fear is my friend even though I have to put it on a leash sometimes
Acina Joy Aug 2018
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And who am I, not to indulge in the festivities of a brittle heart?

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Meh
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