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Mark Toney Nov 2019
1950s kindergarten
cute, dark-haired girl
in jumper dress,
bright-red tights,
walking towards me
smiling...

I run away with sweaty hands...
6/8/2019 - Poetry form: Free Verse - Copyright © Mark Toney | Year Posted 2019
Mark Toney Nov 2019
beware atomic attack!
1950s civil defense
duck and cover drills
Bert the turtle
showed us the way

flash of light - duck and cover!
6/8/2019 - Poetry form: Light Verse - In school we actually did atomic bomb drills where we'd go into the hallway, sit with our backs against the wall, duck our head between our knees and cover our head with our hands! Duck & cover drills! ***! - Copyright © Mark Toney | Year Posted 2019
Sharon Talbot Aug 2018
Why I am so Beat

Something about...the road, old shoes and sore feet,
motorcycles and wine,
greasy diners and last dimes,
half a stale Hoagie left to eat.
Man, that's
why I am so Beat.

Headed out west from town to town.
Dry-rot houses, faded signs,
Pioneers in rags, so behind the times.
This dead world keeps puttin’ me in a funk,
Pal, that’s why
I’d rather just stay drunk.

Girls and boys in every bar,
From Kansas to Colorado,
Hit me up for drinks and manila tar,
Trying sadly to feel what I do,
Man it’s hard;
That’s why I feel so scarred.

I came out west to find my soul
And saw emptiness instead.
Don’t ask me where I’m heading next,
Cause I don’t know.
I’m friggin hexed.
All I know is drive & drink & sleep;
Man, you know
That’s why I am so beat.

August 3, 2018
Inspired by a 50's series of pulp novels, *Why I am So Beat* Nolan Miller. I wanted to capture the same disillusion felt by Beat poets or travelers that the Hippies later felt.
Abby Jun 2018
Let's talk poppies and candies,
Let's talk summer frocks and bees,
Let's talk blue skies ending
In crystal blue seas.
Sure let's talk the neighbors,
Sure let's talk cooking books,
Sure let's talk red lipstick
And guys' good looks!
We're gonna talk Elvis and Marilyn
And Trotsky and Tolstoy,
We're gonna talk Eastern countries
We're about to destroy.
And Italian movies and French perfumes,
Marijuana and milkshake,
Bobby socks and jukebox,
And vacations by the lake.
Let's talk, my dearest pal
All of the above,
But I'd say, first of all,
Let's not talk love.
Terry Collett Mar 2017
I often
wonder what
happened to
that blazer
my old man
bought for me.

For Sunday
best, he said.

It was black
with silver
looking cold
buttons down
the boys' side
as fashion
dictated.

My old man
would fold up
an ironed
cotton white
handkerchief
for the top
small outside
pocket space.

I once had
a coloured
photograph
of me and
the blazer
one Sunday
out some place
with me there
with a smile
on my face.

My old man
is dead now
but where that
black blazer
is now I've
no idea.

Maybe out
there somewhere
in a lost
different sphere.
A BLAZER A FATHER BOUGHT IN 1950S
Terry Collett Nov 2016
You stand against your white
metal bedstead bundled up
in a strait jacket like a neat
parcel awaiting delivery.

Your hands around your
back, out of the way like
exiled rebels. From the
barred window light
comes in, light from a
world out there, out
there where you were
once, once upon a time,
time past and time... bird
sings, can't see it, but it's
there, singing, bringing
sound, nature sounds,
unlike the bedlam noise
that screams outside, screams,
shouts, cries and moans.

Nurses bellowing names,
as if names meant anything
anymore. Any more? yes
please if you have any spare:
a voice calls out from some
place in the ward. You want
out out of this hell hole,
this asylum, this hospital
for the mentally INSANE.

You remember that written
on the gates the day they
brought you. You, your mind
in a mess, mess of memories,
memories of hits, slaps, *****,
head slams and finger feels.

Nurse enters and gazes at you:
cooled down now? Ain't going
to flip out again? You stare at
her, the fat *****, the uniformed
cow. Well? Have you? You
could have her, could take her
out if you weren't bundled up,
quite harmless and sick silent.

The nurse has a wart on her
chin, her eyes piggy eyes.

Ain’t you going to answer?
You smile and nod your head.

That sweet smile of yours
could get men to do things,
if you wanted to, but you
didn't want to do what the
sick ***** wanted you to do.

Piggy nurse unstraps you
slowly, you sense that
freedom, pins and needles,
and able to breathe free.

Be on your best behaviour,
nurse says, and walks off,
the lard **** swaying goes.

You will have her one day,
stuff her like a screaming
fat pig being slowly stuffed.

You smile your smile.

There, there, be better,
be better, in a while.
A WOMAN IN A MENTAL ASYLUM IN 1950S
Lexy Aug 2016
The stars might look like
milky bones from afar.
Or glowing tennis *****,
still clutched in owner's hands
while the dumb dog
chases something hidden.

Did he stick his head
out the window of the spaceship?

Tongue out,
howling.

Did he know the hole
he had dug
was his own grave?

I hate when owners
pretend to throw a ball,
only to hide it behind their backs.

The dog trusts you.
The dog loves you.
The dog loves life.
The dog doesn't want to die.
The dog doesn't deserve to die.
The dog doesn't care about exploring space,
it just wants to find that ******* ball.
I got emotional about the dog they sent to space back in 1957
Terry Collett Aug 2016
One Sunday
evening after tea,
Benny's old man said:
do you want to
go see a horror film?

Yes,
he said,
that'd be good,
but it's an X film
and I won't get in
(He was about
12 then).

Put your long
trousered suit on
white shirt and tie,
and we'll see
what they say.

He Brycreemed
Benny's hair,
polished
his black shoes.

He said:
if anyone asks
how old you are
say nothing,
I’ll tell them.

So off they went
and stood in the queue
at the cinema.

Benny felt
a bit conspicuous
standing there,
but he put on
his unsmiling face,
stared at no one,
and squared his shoulders.

When they got
to the ticket office
his old man said:
two adults please,
and gave her
the money;
she gave him
the tickets.

They went past
the usherette
who just looked
at Benny,
but nothing.

They found two seat
and sat down.

Soon after
the lights were lowered
and the Pearl & Dean
adverts began.

Benny was then
inconspicuous
one of the crowd.

He had been taken
as an adult,
and got into see
an X film:
Doctor Jekyll and Mr Hyde.

He sat there
with a smile,
and with a bit
of schoolboy pride.
A BOY AND HIS FATHER IN LONDON IN 1950S.
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