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Are those green hopes?
Can’t we all hear their whispers love?

Calling without sounds,
Dancing without moves

Palms and fingers touch with heartily sun-sprays.

Together, we all grow,
an emerged labour fun
Where commence to our very first earthly love touch.
By Angel. XJ 01/05/2020
1st May, 1st experiences at an arranged allotment in Chinese campus. A fun seed explore at early Summery
Hello Prolly Jul 2019
on the road
put
honestly
and raw,
my body
needs
your body,
raw
and honestly
put,
on the road
We all need the help of a human being
But most of all we need a relationship
with God.
This life is only shadow of  things to come.
Follow Jesus and you will
Be set free
And  win a glorious crown of beauty
for your soul.
S R Mats Mar 2015
Essence, raw resins
Yellow, brown sticky substance
A scent too earthy
Seán Mac Falls Feb 2015
Ruddy and worn,
Dusted by turf and salt,
Sun rose cheeked and blue
Clouded eye spurt in a gait
Ended by mute journeys and toil.
He breaks the long day with a shove
As the old pocked door is waiting to be
Opened.  At the crowning stand of the bar
He orders his Craic, some froth of tar, his black
Medicinal and when the tales of tall pints grow, sinking,
Live, flickering light slows and smoulders, shoulders with moist
Embers of smoke trailing by with an impromptu céilí and all is brilliant,
Blind, awful and right, cast in the sprite, spirited dance of the verbal swirlings.
"Craic", or "crack", is a term for news, gossip, fun, entertainment, and enjoyable conversation, particularly prominent in Ireland.  It is often used with the definite article – the craic. The word has an unusual history; the English crack was borrowed into Irish as craic in the mid-20th century and the Irish spelling was then reborrowed into English.  Under either spelling, the term has great cultural currency and significance in Ireland.

In modern usage, a céilidh or ceilidh ( pronounced: kay-lee ) is a traditional Gaelic social gathering, which usually involves playing Gaelic folk music and dancing. It originated in Ireland and Scotland, but is now common throughout the Irish and Scottish diasporas. In Irish it is spelt céilí.
Bunny Dec 2014
A man once told me earnestly, I was dirt.

And my mind got all unbalanced with distraught.

What’s the worth of dirt?

It was not until lab nine that the comment touched my heart.



“Composting and Soil” hit an emotional spot.

I am dirt. I am the feminine form of Adam, Adamah.

Biblical Hebrew for “Ground” and “earth.”

The chosen medium of the Father’s formation.



Water, Sun and Air

Father, Son and Holy Spirit

Entering me daily to heal me, grow me, thrive

the seeds He is planting to reveal His vine.



In a very figurative and literal sense.

Daughter, wife and mother ground

Purposed for *******.

Saturated in Christ, piercing love and bearing children.



Teach the fruit only the Lord develops

Through Christ, soil once unworthy, is valuable

Such as man’s duty is to cultivate the earth

I am dirt, Cultivate me.
Seán Mac Falls Jul 2014
Ruddy and worn,
Dusted by turf and salt,
Sun rose cheeked and blue
Clouded eye spurt in a gait
Ended by mute journeys and toil.
He breaks the long day with a shove
As the old pocked door is waiting to be
Opened.  At the crowning stand of the bar
He orders his Craic, some froth of tar, his black
Medicinal and when the tales of tall pints grow, sinking,
Live, flickering light slows and smoulders, shoulders with moist
Embers of smoke trailing by with an impromptu céilí and all is brilliant,
Blind, awful and right, cast in the sprite, spirited dance of the verbal swirlings.
"Craic", or "crack", is a term for news, gossip, fun, entertainment, and enjoyable conversation, particularly prominent in Ireland.  It is often used with the definite article – the craic. The word has an unusual history; the English crack was borrowed into Irish as craic in the mid-20th century and the Irish spelling was then reborrowed into English.  Under either spelling, the term has great cultural currency and significance in Ireland.

In modern usage, a céilidh or ceilidh ( pronounced: kay-lee ) is a traditional Gaelic social gathering, which usually involves playing Gaelic folk music and dancing. It originated in Ireland and Scotland, but is now common throughout the Irish and Scottish diasporas. In Irish it is spelt céilí.

— The End —