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Shelter my eyes, with lighted skin,
Touch me with printed flame, rapt
In songs of joy, for I am unarmed,

Lift me to the spiral keeps of soul,
Spires thrusting in hearts firmament,
Set free in curled locks of your hair,

Let us be new as babes are nestled,
Long in the pines of the bristlecones,
Ageless and evergreen in cloudy bed,

Close the lids of night in sensate blue,
In eyes piercing painted skies of dark,
See my shroud cast out with the dawn.
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Bristlecone pines are known for attaining great ages.  Some bristlecone pine individuals are more than 5,000 years old and are the oldest known individuals of any species. Bristlecone pine grow in scattered subalpine groves at high altitude in arid regions of the Western United States.
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Like trees when friends meet
Windy gesticulations . . .
The heartbeat of boughs
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Without rains sun pools
Unruly lilacs next door
Feeds ambrosia
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In my darkest hour, by the rage of sun,
I met her in a shower of April days,
Riding to the moon in twined études,
The dry chrysalis of winter shells
Gave way to lightness, glaze,
The rain in our eyes, amaze,
Her voice as it fluted, broke,
Like feathers from a wandering bird,
Were my wings of iridescence and joy
And we were blind when we were born,
We were blind as bells of floating grace,
Lived forever by such a new shore,
Such ends of buzzing time,
As May flies.
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To serve some Sake
Soft light bathing the mountains
Eyes gleam as we pour
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From Wikipedia:
In Japan, where it is the national beverage, sake is often served with special ceremony, where it is gently warmed in a small earthenware or porcelain bottle and sipped from a small porcelain cup called a sakazuki.
Sake is often consumed as part of Shinto purification rituals. Sake is served to gods as offerings.
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Sake with old friends
Leaves spring forth from hazel tree
Sharing ancient boughs
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From Wikipedia:
In Japan, where it is the national beverage, sake is often served with special ceremony, where it is gently warmed in a small earthenware or porcelain bottle and sipped from a small porcelain cup called a sakazuki.
Sake is often consumed as part of Shinto purification rituals. Sake is served to gods as offerings.
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Owls speak at night
Voices breaking in darkness
Always in questions
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