Classics  
Kobayashi Issa (小林一茶) was a Japanese poet and lay Buddhist priest of the Jodo Shinshu sect known for his haiku poems and journals. He is better known as simply Issa (一茶), a pen name meaning Cup-of-tea (lit. "one tea"). He is regarded as one of the four haiku masters in ... Read more
Kobayashi Issa (小林一茶) was a Japanese poet and lay Buddhist priest of the Jodo Shinshu sect known for his haiku poems and journals. He is better known as simply Issa (一茶), a pen name meaning Cup-of-tea (lit. "one tea"). He is regarded as one of the four haiku masters in ... Read more

Don't worry, spiders,
I keep house
casually.

Napping at midday
I hear the song of rice planters
and feel ashamed of myself.

The pheasant cries
as if it just noticed
the mountain.

Pissing in the snow
outside my door--
it makes a very straight hole.

Writing shit about new snow
for the rich
is not art.

The man pulling radishes
pointed my way
with a radish.

New Year's morning:
the ducks on the pond
quack and quack.

A cuckoo sings
to me, to the mountain,
    to me, to the mountain.

That wren--
looking here, looking there.
You lose something?

This moth saw brightness
in a woman's chamber--
burnt to a crisp.

All the time I pray to Buddha
I keep on
killing mosquitoes.

In this world
we walk on the roof of hell,
gazing at flowers.

Face of the spring moon--
about twelve years old,
I'd say.

In spring rain
a pretty girl
    yawning.

Napped half the day;
no one
punished me!

The moon tonight--
I even miss
her grumbling.

His death poem:

        A bath when you're born,
        a bath when you die,
        how stupid.

The toad! It looks like
it could belch
a cloud.

Summer night--
even the stars
are whispering to each other.

With my father
I would watch dawn
over green fields.

 
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