Matsuo Bashō   (1644 - 1694, Japanese)
Matsuo Bashō (松尾 芭蕉) was the most famous poet of the Edo period in Japan. During his lifetime, Bashō was recognized for his works in ...
Kobayashi Issa   (1763 - 1828, Japanese)
Kobayashi Issa (小林一茶) was a Japanese poet and lay Buddhist priest of the Jodo Shinshu sect known for his haiku poems and journals. He is ...
Taigu Ryokan   (1758-1831, Japanese)
Ryōkan was born in the village of Izumozaki in Echigo Province (now Niigata Prefecture) in Japan to the village headman. He renounced the world at ...
Yosa Buson   (1716 - 1783, Japanese)
Yosa Buson, or Yosa no Buson (与謝蕪村), was a Japanese poet and painter from the Edo period. Along with Matsuo Bashō and Kobayashi Issa, Buson ...
Ono no Komachi   (c. 825 – c. 900 (?), Japanese)
Like Ariwara no Narihira, the legends have eclipsed the historical Ono no Komachi. Her poetry dates from the period 833-857, and she seems to have ...
Yamabe no Akahito   (700 - 740, Japanese)
Little is known of Yamabe no Akahito other than what we can gain from his fifty poems in the Manyoshu. His thirteen Nagauta poems and ...
Koi Nagata   (1900 ~ 1997, Japanese)
Man in summer sees feet in old pond... and dies Sad the summer ocean - those two feet [from "Degree Zero", 1970-75] Born in 1900 ...
Kakio Tomizawa   (1902 ~ 1962, Japanese)
Kakio was born the first son of a doctor in Ehime; studied economics at Waseda University; while a student, wrote some haiku; in 1926, shortly ...
Sekitei Hara   (1889 ~ 1951, Japanese)
Haiku magazine Hototogisu, directed by Kyoshi Takahama, produced many brilliant haikuists. The first wave, in Taisho era, was composed of the poets such as Kijo ...
 
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