"Anemone naves and kelpie skins,"
Ormond 

She rides the chanting waves
At the seas horizon,
In fires of star sheen and moon shine,
Sweet Niamh of the golden hair, and aqua eyes,

Princess of the green sea turtles,
Of the coral sea grottos,
Anemone naves and kelpie skins,
Trailing the rainbow schools of the whirling fin,

The whole twining ocean globe of blue is swooning
Under the milky waving skies and unfathoming deeps,
Her laughter lighting the unremembered bottom of the seas.

In Irish mythology, Niamh ( "bright" or "radiant". Niav, Neve, Neave, Neeve and Nieve ) was a goddess, the daughter of the god of the sea ( Manannán mac Lir ) and one of the queens of Tír na nÓg, the land of eternal youth. She was the lover of the poet-hero Oisín.
"Anemone naves and kelpie skins,"
Ormond 

She rides the chanting waves
At the seas horizon,
In fires of star sheen and moon shine,
Sweet Niamh of the golden hair, and aqua eyes,

Princess of the green sea turtles,
Of the coral sea grottos,
Anemone naves and kelpie skins,
Trailing the rainbow schools of the whirling fin,

The whole twining ocean globe of blue is swooning
Under the milky waving skies and unfathoming deeps,
Her laughter lighting the unremembered bottom of the seas.

In Irish mythology, Niamh ( "bright" or "radiant". Niav, Neve, Neave, Neeve and Nieve ) was a goddess, the daughter of the god of the sea ( Manannán mac Lir ) and one of the queens of Tír na nÓg, the land of eternal youth. She was the lover of the poet-hero Oisín.
"**Kelpie (Celtic)**"
Claire R 

Puca (Celtic)
A faerie it shall be,
shifting forms constantly,
a black horse, glowing eyes,
yellow as the moon,
ride his back and o'er you go,
tumbling down the cliff.

Kitsune (Japanese)
Smart and strong,
clever and wise,
nine tails in all,
nine tails divine,
Tricky pests, is what they seem,
they're know to lurk inside your dreams.

Leshy (Slavic)
Lords of the forest, standing tall,
pale as a bone, dark green eyes,
tricksters they seem, mischievous and wild,
bewar their cry, it is wild,
protecting their animals, living and dead,
their home is where the tree roots tread.

Huldra (Scandinavian)
Neither good nor bad,
a flirty lass,
she walks the forest hidden.
Bearing a tail of a cow,
she hides it behind her back,
Somehow she stays above the ground,
while all the rest are lost.

Mare (Scandinavian)
Lurking in the shadows,
the crevices of your mind,
she sits atop you as you dream
and haunts your very soul,
creating dreams, she learns your fears,
your weaknesses and your lies,
she twists them all together
for a terrible surprise.

Nokken (Scandinavian)
Nky, he's sometimes called,
moving beneath the surface,
the water is still, barely a ripple,
Playing the violin, fiddling through the night,
trapping unprotected travellers.
Throw a piece of metal in and say the ancient rhyme:
“Nyk! Nyk!
Naal i vatn.
Jomfru Maria kastet styaal i vatn!
Du sæk, æk flyt!”

Kelpie (Celtic)
Mystical water horse,
pretending to be trapped,
drawing in the children,
luring them with their beauty,
changing into lovely women,
drawing in passing men,
drowning, drowning,
underneath where hope is lost.

Encantado (Brazilian)
Dolphin or snake, living beneath the surface,
morphing into a woman,
singing, luring, drawing you near,
taking you into the night.
Controlling minds and storms alike,
do not near the river's edge,
for surely you will be taken, too.

I know there are many, many more creatures, and there are more to come.
I'm sorry if my information is not all correct.
"Anemone naves and kelpie skins,"
Ormond 

She rides the chanting waves
At the seas horizon,
In fires of star sheen and moon shine,
Sweet Niamh of the golden hair, and aqua eyes,

Princess of the green sea turtles,
Of the coral sea grottos,
Anemone naves and kelpie skins,
Trailing the rainbow schools of the whirling fin,

The whole twining ocean globe of blue is swooning
Under the milky waving skies and unfathoming deeps,
Her laughter lighting the unremembered bottom of the seas.

In Irish mythology, Niamh ( "bright" or "radiant". Niav, Neve, Neave, Neeve and Nieve ) was a goddess, the daughter of the god of the sea ( Manannán mac Lir ) and one of the queens of Tír na nÓg, the land of eternal youth. She was the lover of the poet-hero Oisín.
"Kelpie dogs tongue"
Elizabeth Squires 

upon the Abington Station's
long shearing board
the feats of one shearer
cannot be ignored
a run of two hundred sheep
he can easily shear
his style with the cutting comb
is without peer
contractors in the district
know of his pace
he removes fleeces
with an elegant grace

the Lister wool press
compacts all the long day
whilst the gun shearer
works tirelessly away
Kelpie dogs tongue
keeping his race full
as Layto shears the fine clips
of merino wool
none are as effective
with comb in hand
in the regional area
of the New England

Layto shears the sheep
cleanly and effortlessly
whether the fleeces
be thick or slightly oily
his shearing abilities
are know of near and far
on the shearing shed board
he's always bettered par
when he hangs up
the cutting comb to retire
fellow shearers will of him
greatly admire

A gun shearer, shearers sheep quickly.
"than any kelpie seas,"
Rainey Birthwright 

you said my hair,
so awful red, set fire
to the gorse petals,
you said my eyes,
darker, more green,
than any kelpie seas,
were sunken treasures,
skins on the stars, murky,
pearls to milky velvet face
of freckled, violet heavens,
you gave me wee flowers,
wilder than heather bloom,
you kissed me so deep
i fell over the moon,
you breathed bare
my holey soul,
you, my lad,
were rare,
my only,
poet.

"Another Kelpie, Cattle Dog Cross,"
Dracol Noir 

Tall tales and true,
Tally Ho, Paraburdoo,
One tail that's Blue,
Australian dog, town Dampier,
Another Kelpie, Cattle Dog Cross,
Red Dog, the pilgrim wanderer.
Dried, barren landscapes,
Tally, Blue, Dampier Salt,
Wounds, numerous fights and scrapes.
Inspiration looks us down,
Dampier folks will look up,
Overlooking Dampier town,
All but just a memory.

Had to write a poem on the 2011 film "Red Dog" in my junior years. You'd understand it if you know what the movie was about, or even the novel (by Louis de Bernières).
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