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as dyne
packed parch
and hard
in pettifog
with hopes
of his
fine lore
would evoke
lavender oil
then exhume
reed with
desire there
longing Rembrandt
but with
gallivant now
ripe with
more gestalt
a gas with a reed
Nis Jun 2018
Standing at the Rijksmuseum
we find ourselves part of a lesson,
a lesson by a master in his craft.
Our company seven men
some look at us some look away
while Dr. Tulp, our eighth man
digs into the elefant in the room.

The cool body lies bare
like light were coming out of it
reflecting on the faces of the more curious,
leaving in shadows the uninterested ones.
The dead arm opened wide,
some lesson on tendons or bones.
Three hundred and fifty years
mute the master's words so clear
make the master's brushes so loud.

It was a time of studied ignorance,
of white collars on shallow knowledge
when my favourite of the Old Masters was born.

Retract.
Step back into our reality
observe the beatiful museum
for we are before one of its finest pieces.
But it's hard.
It ***** you in.
Something about the crepuscular glow of the body
makes you get stuck in it.

Observe the perfect composition,
the diverse faces.
It's like a photograph taken at a random instant
yet so deliberate,
so randomly deliberate,
so deliberatly random.
But step back,
look at the whole thing,
it's just
so
beautiful.
You could say it's just 3D
masterfully represented in 2D
but it is not,
there's something more to it.
Something you could call extradimensional.
It's like if the artist knew the algorithms our mind follows
and knew the exact input needed for the desired output,
beauty,
art,
even shock.

Let's move on to the next painting,
but don't let this image fade away,
let it rest,
let it click,
and let it grow
in you.
Partially inspired by Nightwatch by King Crimson, in my opinion one of their most underapreciated songs, this is me trying to pass to you the wonderful sensation I felt when looking at Anatomy lesson by Rembrandt, in my opinion one of the best paintings by one of the best paintors ever.
You’re a work of art
Not as poised as a painting
Not as tangible as a sculpture
Not real enough to be a photograph
Not fake enough to be a drawing
The lines of your nose
The angles of your lip
The shadows of your collar bone
The wrinkles of your smile
The dots of your skin
The curvature of your teeth
The length of your limbs
The flow of your hair
But the words that fall off your tongue
The trickle of your laugh
To me
You are worthy of a museum
Henry Koskoff Jan 2018
visage on mirror
rembrandt could have painted this
sheer cloth, bare body
I.

a dandelion blooms in late July, atop a hill in Berkham

its semblance meager in its youth, though quite unlike the rest, thought he

frissons of an e minor longing resound and sorrow compels his gawky gait

to take to the wildflowers, in search of a beauty unassuming;

he had always been fond of dandelions.

II.

the hills ablaze with yellows and golds, he seeks a single blossom;

plucks it from its roots eternal, a treasure solely his to cherish

its petals rouse his doleful heart till months elapse and chill the wind

yet how puerile, how absurd to preserve a blossom sans its roots!

he thinks it a futile endeavor;  

the repugnant **** to be disposed of forthwith.

III.

a dandelion wilts in early May, atop a sill in Cambridge

fervor compels his pois'd gait to take to the wildflowers

in search of a beauty conspicuous;

he had always been fond of azaleas.
Poetry to go with my art song[s] of the same title.
Lucius Furius Aug 2017
Rembrandt, you maniac!
While other guys were down at the local tavern,
drinking and playing cards,
-- or off visiting Paris --,
you were in the studio.
Long after your students had left,
there you were, slaving away.

Did your family get sick of posing?

Others painted us as we seem
-- a bit better-looking, I suppose. . . .
You painted us as we are:
proud, sorrowful, hopeful, uncertain.

Where we'd seen only ugliness you found beauty.

The Bible? You made it human:
We felt Christ's pain! Magdalene's astonishment.

You were foolish with your money,
failed to pay your debts.
We forgive you.

You were stubborn, mean, obsessed.
You loved us
only when you were painting us.
We forgive you.

You worked on your own paintings
instead of ones which might have sold at higher prices,
ones which might have paid your debts.
We forgive you.
Because your art is so incomparably beautiful
we forgive you.
Hear Lucius/Jerry read the poem:  humanist-art.org/audio/SoF_099_rembrandt.MP3 .
This poem is part of the Scraps of Faith collection of poems ( https://humanist-art.org/scrapsoffaith.htm )
Rambo Dec 2016
Never he was an honest man
Who prides himself
On wanton expeditions

In a field of truth
He lies, entangled in conceit
To win that which he desires –
It is only but a game.

Mind not his mental means, nor manner –
Be he sane or psychopath –
But the strategy by which he plays:
Cheat, deceive, manipulate,
Overcome, and conquer your carnal estate.

Twisted tales, spun with golden thread
Crafted by careful practice and confidence
The master of charisma in his own head
Is no Eros, in any sense – Erosive, yes –
He is only what you want but for a brief moment
Be suspicious and expect this ever-real Narcissus.

A lecher he is
A Greek God in wish –
Nay, he only lives in the fantastic,
Though he roams about us
In a surreal bubble,
Where love comes to pass,
He is ever-so subtle

He markets himself as a Rembrandt,
Although more a moke* than baroque,
Something which he could never see
Staring into his reflection so blindly.
At a cost, worth more than his fee,
This cheap knockoff of Sal Dali,
Would sell you his love
For a buck forty-three.

Beware the lecher.
*Moke is a British/Australian slang term for donkey or *******; a fool, representing the folly of man.
"Where is my Monet?", I say
As I look through the blurred vision of an impressionist day.
A double paned view of reality
Swaying beauty through eyes once knew.

Where is my Monet  or be it Van Gough?
All beauty's vision framed newly printed Picasso.
Shadow me done, and once never knew
What others should have seen as they counted me too.

So now, I say no
Not of Van Gough nor Monet,
I see beauty no Rembrandt nor Picasso to sway.
I see a simple little girl with all she will need
To see the world lovely and in the midst of all, succeed.
April 16, 2004
Leah Barton Apr 2016
He is a sturdy stable table
Any wifey's wanton wish
Working his 9 to forevers
Taste of coffee on his lips

Desk ***** playing hide and seek
Contracts waiting to be signed
But sadly his white collar's crooked
From buttons that are misaligned

Inside he's a vagabond
Prancing in his dime store shoes
Paisley shining in the streetlight
Reflecting psychedelic hues

Inside he's a wordsmith Rembrandt
Charming ladies with his rhymes
Painting landscapes with his vowels
Starting hearts and stopping time

— The End —